Spring in the morning….summer after noon!

WOW! What a weekend. This weather has finally made a turn for the better. Sunny and 80s! With that being said, I had several “adult” commitments with my employer that required my attention this weekend, so instead of walking the fields of Richland County…I was busy on the bench completing surgical biopsy testing for the lab.

I was able to sneak out Thursday with the dog and little human. We made a collection between rain clouds at The Ohio State University Mansfield Campus. There is a cute research preserve as well as wooded areas all around campus. My crew gave it a good try! There are plenty of water breaks and snacks when you have a toddler and a 13yr old Chihuahua at your side!

This week’s presentation consists of Wildflowers. I am convinced what I found were mostly fancy weeds. I suppose what someone may thing is a weed, another would be thrilled to find in their private gardens. Tomato….tomahto! I still think I found weeds because I am not 100% certain if I identified these correctly.

Enjoy the presentation!

 

Wild Flower #1

Look at that star the overlapping  pedals make!

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the wooded area just west of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 280 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Wild Geranium Scientific name: Geranium maculatum

Corolla:  number of petals separate or  fusedSeparate

Calyx:    number of sepals separate or fused? Separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 10 separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

The stamens were separate and attached with the petals at the base of the carpel. 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Unicarpellate with 1 central carpal and no obvious lobed regions of the stigma. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: Leafs were oppositely arranged, toothed, and had significant lobes.

Wildflower #2

So Violet!

Fuzzy!

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the wooded area just west of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 30 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Common Blue Violet  Scientific name: Violet papilioncecea

Corolla:  number of petals separate or  fusedSeparate

Calyx:    number of sepals separate or fused? Separate

Adroecium: number of stamens separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

The stamens were separate and attached with the petals at the base of the carpel. 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Unicarpellate with 1 central carpal and no obvious lobed regions of the stigma. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: The pedals overlapped in such a way to create a tunnel were the inside of the pedals were fuzzy!

Wildflower #3

Dandelion and Friend!

Deep lobes & spear-like.

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the grassland area just east of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 362 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Common Dadnelion  Scientific name: Taraxacum officnale

Corolla:  number of petals 100+ separate or  fusedFused

Calyx:    number of sepals 12 separate or fused? Separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 100+ separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

1. Carpel + Stamen
2. Ray+Carpel+Stamen: Floret
3. Dried Bract
4. Green Bract

The stamens were fused with the carpel and petal ray to created a floret. All structures attached at the receptacle of the flower head. 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Apocarpous with many florets. Each floret has a carpel. 100+carpels.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Perigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: This is a composite flower!

Wildflower #4

Oh so Yellow!

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the grassland area just east of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 378 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Golden Ragwort Scientific name: Senecio aureus

Corolla: number of petals 50+ separate or  fusedFused

Calyx: number of sepals 12 separate or fused? Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens 50separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

The stamens were fused with the carpel in a compact floret. All structures attached at the receptacle of the flower head. 50+carpels.

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Apocarpous with many florets. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Perigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: This is a composite flower with 9 slender petal rays! The florets were so small I needed my lens to see!

So Tiny!

Wildflower #5

One of my favorite finds!

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the grassland area just east of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 240 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Rough Cinquefoil Scientific name: Potentilla robbinsiana

Corolla: number of petals separate or  fusedSeparate

Calyx: number of sepals 10  separate or fused? Separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 24 separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

The stamens separate and had rather large anthers. They were also taller than the stigma of the carpel. All structures fused attached at the receptacle. 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Apocarpous with many(20+) carpels that are multichambered. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Perigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: Cute little flower with fuzzy stems and leaflets.

Wildflower #6

It is Daisy-like!

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the grassland area just east of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 382 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Common Fleabane Scientific name: Erigeron philadelphicus

Corolla: number of petals 100+ separate or  fusedFused

Calyx: number of sepals 20 separate or fused? Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens 100+ separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

The stamens were fused with the carpel in a compact floret. 100+ florets=100+ carpels. All structures attached at the receptacle of the flower head. 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Apocarpous with many carpels. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Perigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: This is a composite flower has at least 70 white slender petal rays!

Wildflower #7

Looks like a mini sanp dragon!

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the grassland area just east of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 94 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Meehania Scientific name: Meehania cordata

Corolla: number of petals separate or  fusedFused

Calyx: number of sepals separate or fused? Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

The stamens were separate and appeared to attach above the ovary region of the carpel.

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

1 Syncarpous gynoecium that has two finger like tips at the stigma.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Epigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: Smells like mint when crushed!

 

Wildflower #8

4 little pedals!

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): In the grassland area just east of the research ponds:  OSU Mansfield

It is on page 144 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name Marsh Yellow Cress Scientific name: Rorippa slandica

Corolla: number of petals separate or  fusedSeparate

Calyx: number of sepals separate or fused? Separate

Adroecium: number of stamens separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

The stamens separate. All structures fused attached at the receptacle. 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Unicarpellate with 1 carpel.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: These were by far the most abundant yellow flower on this site currently in bloom. 

 

Until Next time!!